Posted by: Bryan B. | October 30, 2011

How to Prevent Halloween Eye Injuries?

For the past few weeks most St. Louisans, like me, have had a serious case of baseball fever.  (WAHOOOO Cardinals!!!) And each week as I have been sitting down to write – I have been looking for ways to tie baseball and the optical industry together.  But nothing has come to me.  So now that Halloween is upon us and baseball season is officially over,  it’s time to move on.  (But, yay!  Cardinals!!! wahoo! wahoo!!!!!)

Anyway – back to Halloween…

The web site, www.preventblindness.org has compiled a list of tips to keep your eyes (and the rest of your body) safe on Halloween.

Costumes and Safety

  • Avoid costumes with masks, wigs, floppy hats or eye patches that block vision.
  • Tie hats and scarves securely so they don’t slip over children’s eyes.
  • Avoid costumes that drag on the ground to prevent tripping or falling.
  • Avoid pointed props such as spears, swords or wands that may harm other children’s eyes.
  • Wear bright, reflective clothing or decorate costumes and bags with reflective tape/patches.
  • Carry a bright flashlight to improve visibility.
  • Do not ride a bike/scooter/skateboard or rollerblades while wearing a costume.
  • Obey all traffic signals—pedestrian and driver.
  • Younger children should go with an adult while trick-or-treating around the neighborhood. Older children should trick-or-treat in groups.
  • Use common sense. Never dart out between parked cars or hidden corners such as alleys. Avoid streets under construction. Don’t trick or-treat in busy commercial areas or where there is heavy traffic.
  • Go trick-or-treating in daylight, as it is safer than going after dark.
  • A safer option is to go to a Halloween party instead of trick-or-treating.

Cosmetics and Contacts Lenses

  • Wear hypoallergenic makeup. Have an adult apply the makeup and remove it with cold cream instead of soap. Use makeup in place of masks.
  • Cosmetic contacts that make your eyes look like cat’s eyes may seem like fun, especially at Halloween. However, these lenses come with the same risks as regular contact lenses. This growing fad may seem harmless, but it is not!
  • Improper use of cosmetic lenses can lead to serious eye complications. These problems include bacterial infections, swelling, eye pain, sensitivity to light, conjunctivitis (pink eye), corneal scratches, corneal ulceration and even permanent loss of sight.
  • Never buy cosmetic contacts without a prescription! Never share your cosmetic contacts with others or use someone else’s contacts. (See our previous post about contacts that make your eyes look big.)
  • Since this fad is popular among teens, be vigilant about older kids’ appearance before letting them leave the house. If they are wearing these contacts, ask where they got them.

Use caution when choosing and applying any makeup. If you are not used to wearing makeup, you should only wear hypo-allergenic makeup and avoid an unexpected allergic reaction.  If you are used to wearing makeup, make sure it is new as older makeup typically has a lot of germs. And, if possible, avoid sharing eye make up. Sharing makeup is a good way to pass along germs which could lead to irritation, or even worse , eye infections.

Happy Halloween, everyone!
http://www.preventblindness.org/sites/default/files/national/documents/fact_sheets/MK35_TrickTreat.pdf
http://www.chla.org/site/c.ipINKTOAJsG/b.6064373/k.6EA6/Halloween_Vision_Safety_Tips__Healthy_Eye_Care__The_Vision_Center.htm
http://www.frisco-online.com/index.php/news/kids/health-amp-safety/1568.html

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Responses

  1. Tying baseball to the optical industry? What about talking about the players that wear the safety glasses while they are playing & if they are prescription or not… or what to do if you get dirt, or grass in the eye while playing… or what to do if your contact falls out on the field during play… the possibilities are endless! AMCON even has those dynabands that are really good for holding frames on the face during sports. 🙂


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